HUB Life - Triathlon and Endurance Lifestyle

#17 Reignite: Mastering Life's Reset Button for Goal-Driven Transformation

August 20, 2023 Dr. Marion Herring and Dr. Rob Green
HUB Life - Triathlon and Endurance Lifestyle
#17 Reignite: Mastering Life's Reset Button for Goal-Driven Transformation
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Welcome to another invigorating episode of  HUB Life: Mastering Life's Reset Button for Goal-Driven Transformation!

🎙️ In this episode, we're delving deep into the art of hitting the reset button in life and harnessing the power of transformation through focused training. Whether you're feeling stuck, overwhelmed, or simply seeking a fresh start, this episode is your guide to reigniting your inner fire and redefining your path toward success.

Description:
Life has a way of throwing curveballs, but it's in those moments that the possibility of a reset becomes more alluring than ever. Join us as we explore the five crucial steps to reigniting your life's engine and training yourself to not just adapt, but thrive.

Step 1: Realize You Need a Reset
We kick off the episode by examining the signs that indicate it's time for a reset. Sometimes, taking a step back and giving yourself the space to breathe is the first and most vital move toward regaining your clarity. Learn how to let go of the guilt and embrace the power of a clean slate.

Step 2: Be Realistic Where You Are Now
Acknowledging your current state—both mentally and physically—is pivotal to crafting a sustainable reset strategy. We discuss ways to confront your current reality without self-judgment, allowing you to build a strong foundation for the journey ahead.

Step 3: Focus on What You Can Do
We dive into the concept of realistic optimism. Discover how to shift your focus from what you can't control to what you can influence. By directing your energy towards attainable actions, you'll pave the way for small wins that accumulate into significant achievements.

Step 4: Reset Your Goals That Excite You
Goals should inspire, not confine. We guide you through the process of redefining your aspirations, ensuring they align with your passions and values. Learn how to set meaningful goals that ignite your motivation and keep you committed for the long haul.

Step 5: Have Fun!
Resetting doesn't mean abandoning joy. In fact, having fun can and will enhance your results and make the process enjoyable. We share tips on how to maintain a sense of adventure while striving for your goals.

Join us for an episode filled with insights, practical strategies, and real-life examples of resets leading to success. Whether you're seeking to rekindle a sense of purpose or completely reshape your path, this episode will empower you to master the art of resetting for goal-driven mindset. Remember, your journey is unique, but you don't have to navigate it alone. Tune in now and reignite your drive!

Here are the links for Team Ryan and their story.  Let's help them get to Kona! 
Team Ryan and their Fundraising efforts:
https://ironmanfoundation.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.participant&participantID=3354

Team Ryan 
https://youtube.com/watch?v=ZnPInmpBq3Q

🔗 Listen on your favorite podcast platform or visit our website at www.hubtrainingcenter.com and hubtrainingcenter.com/blog/  to access show notes, resources, and content. Don't miss out on the opportunity to transform your life, one reset at a time.

Speaker 1:

Welcome. I'm Dr Moose Herring, Orthopedic Sports Medicine Specialist.

Speaker 2:

I'm Dr Rob Green, Sports Chiropractor, Coach, Trustee Sidekick. We are Lifetime Endurance Athletes. We are Eager Lab Rats.

Speaker 1:

We are Maker of Many Mistakes. We are Family-focused sports medicine docs that are balancing family work and fitness and are enjoying the ride While we are sports medicine professionals. This podcast is not part of our professional responsibilities. No doctor, patient or coach-athlete relationship developed this podcast. We have no financial support from any outside resources. The only support we get is from our fantastic wives that sit back and look at us in complete dismay.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to HubLife. Enjoy the show. Welcome back to HubLife. Episode man, it's getting up there. I don't know, I can't keep count anymore 17.

Speaker 1:

17. It's exciting. 17.

Speaker 2:

That's pretty cool, yeah, we're. You know, 17 attempts to get better, right, every 17 attempts to get better. So I think we're coming along. So, those of you that are still listening, those that we got some new listeners- Thank you. Yeah, we appreciate it, man. This is HubLife, so HubTrainingCentercom and Hubway, and we just appreciate you joining the HubLife.

Speaker 1:

Exactly.

Speaker 2:

What's going on in your world, man? What's happening?

Speaker 1:

Nothing, just trying to get back to my new normal. We got to take Molly to school Santa to Santa Cruz. What a cool place that is to run and ride and hike and I think she's in a good place. It's good. The rest of the kids are doing well. So we're. School starts next week, so we're heading down that road again.

Speaker 2:

I thought it was so cool. You just, you just showed me a picture of Molly there down down in San Francisco, of the Golden Gate Bridge, down in like Chrissy Field, and I was like can you imagine? She's sitting there with her friends going my dad swim from way over here to right here. I swam all the way and he did it like multiple years in a row. How cool is that.

Speaker 1:

Five years. Yeah, that's fantastic and that's and that's another point of you know, when you, when you go, and you're able to go drop your kids off at school, and you can run with them and you can ride with them and you can you can hike with them. Long term, fitness is crucial. It's crucial. I couldn't imagine not being able to do those things, because that time with her is just so incredible. Yeah, I mean think about it.

Speaker 2:

She's starting something brand new too. You're, you're nervous, no matter what. I'm sure your anxiety levels up a bit. And you know what does she do with that Her first week in there. She's getting out of the house, she's out, she's being active. You've, you've instilled that through example. I mean she does it without even like thinking the need to do it. It's become habit.

Speaker 1:

So that's, impressive.

Speaker 2:

We had our open house. We had our open house, which was really cool. Thank you to everybody who came out you, guys are a big crowd. Yeah, we, you know, I was surprised. It's one of those things where you have it and you're like, well, I don't know like, is there a little, is there a lot? And no, we just had a great turnout and we, richmond Tri Club, you know, it's just, it's so great here in Richmond. I mean, we're just lucky to have the culture that we do of the endurance community. It's a, it's a such a great active community and nothing embodies it like our local endurance. Yeah, teams like Richmond Tri Club, richmond Road Runners Club, we've got Marathon Training team. So, yeah, great turnout and you know it was, it was geared towards them. What can we do and serve it to them to? You know, help them be the best, you right, help them be the best of themselves. So, between doing, you know, full body assessment things, doing small group workouts, doing they had some massage therapists here and teaching how to use them, improving your self care, right, how to improve it. So this is a lot of fun man, a lot of fresh faces, and we really met somebody very, very interesting man. I thought it was, I thought it was really cool. We met Vince Sheehan and of team Ryan, and remember, last year, right, we we saw. So Chris Nick it's, I think, is how you say it, right. So, chris Nick itch was the athlete with Down syndrome who was training in an attempt to complete Kona last year and he did, and we got the opportunity to see him at Ohio as well as at Kona Right, remember, remember seeing?

Speaker 1:

him. What did you think of that? I thought they, I thought they weren't great in in in Ohio with him because they, you know the, the, the swim in Ohio. They started him three or four minutes before the top group, so I can't imagine what his sense was when he got the water and then four, four, five minutes later, this big swim people came by him. I had forgotten all about.

Speaker 2:

We saw him go and then we were soon after that and he they didn't, they let. And this was a big, huge streamline of us and they let us swim before he hit that first turn buoy it was a tight course he had to have gotten pummeled, pummeled.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I forgot about that. And then he had, he had some mechanical, but it just his, his. His energy level and his positive spirit are unbelievable.

Speaker 2:

So that Ohio race, that's what I was telling. Um, uh, vince, as we cover Vince, he had some issues that came up that day between the swim and the mechanical and and that sort of derailed his day. And we were finishing, um, like kind of picking up our bike stuff, and we saw Chris running and then we saw his team I think it was his dad too. It was out there. We're like what's going on? He's like, yeah, you know, it wasn't his day, uh, this happened, this happened. So he wanted to get his running and he was still running. I was like man, I love this dude, holy cow, are you serious? I'd have been like I'd have grabbed my stuff and gone to my car and pouted. I'm out.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm out.

Speaker 2:

And he um. So we became huge fans of his uh, right away. And then got to see him in Kona and boy that I'll tell you what man for him to get through. And he completed it. First athlete with Down syndrome to complete. And what an inspiration, right, right. So now, now at the open house, sharing stories and meeting people, and and Vince I'm not exactly sure how it came up oh, I think it's cause he's he's fundraising for Kona, he's doing Kona um 2024. And it was like, oh, so what's what's happening? And he's like, well, I'm, I'm raising money I've got to raise, he's got to raise $25,000. And I was like, oh, so what's the inspiration? And then he told me, uh, for team Ryan, his son has Down syndrome. I believe he's 14, ryan, so that's why the team Ryan. And that, uh, I was like, oh, that's incredible. Do you know, chris? He's like, no, chris, we've followed him all last year and inspired us. So I remember thinking last year boy, that's really cool about Chris. He's inspiring others. This is really neat. What, what a great accomplishment. And then to meet somebody who he directly, who he directly inspired, who makes that much of a difference. Ryan sees Chris on the screen and is like wow, look at that, I'm doing that. True impact, dude, true impact. So, uh, so, yeah, we'll, we'll. We've got an interview with Vince that we'll share. Um, uh, he shared his story. He's their team, ryan, uh, they are, he's got to. He got to. He gets to as. Moose would say he gets to raise $25,000, uh, uh, for um, for the foundation, and it's just a wonderful thing. So we'll put up a link for that If you're, if you're able to consider I mean anything. I mean it's such a cliche, but it's so true. If you've ever raised money, every dollar counts. I mean, if it's a dollar, $5, whatever it is. But, um, we'll put a link up um, support them, because Chris motivated and inspired Vince and his son, ryan, and Vince and Ryan are then going to do things, and they're doing things locally to inspire us locally, but are going to go to a race like that and then continue to inspire others. So so, please, if you have the ability, back them and, um, you'll hear a cool interview a little, show their story a little bit.

Speaker 1:

It's fantastic.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so what PTO? Pto is going on.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, singapore was this weekend. I haven't seen much, much with it. I saw Ashley Gentle won the women's race Um top field. Any howl was in it. Lucy Charles was in it, chelsea Sidara, who won Conan last year, was in it. It's a lot of fit people racing fast and that new, it's a. It's a newer distance to us, so it seems like it's about a half Ironman time for the fast people. But what do you think about the new? Or are the? What do you think about this distance?

Speaker 2:

I don't know yet. You're right. So so 2K. So it's the way I try to remember because it's a little tricky, because we've been so ingrained in in different instances. It's a 100K race, so it's a 2K swim. It's a 80K bike, which, think about that 50 miles, and then it's an 18K run, which is 15. So the the swim is longer, the bike is short relative to a half Ironman and the run is two miles longer. So it's like who does that favor Is that? Is that a little bit more to the runner? The swimmer's got a little bit more into the mix. Um, I guess you race it like a half Ironman, but like those extra two miles on the run. Um, do you bike hard Like it's? I have been, having not done it, you know it'd be interesting to kind of mess around those distances. I think it's really pretty. I don't know. I'm intrigued by it. What do you think?

Speaker 1:

I'm not sure. Yeah, so 18K is six. I don't think it's 15 miles.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, man, I'm doing the wrong. Oh yeah, wow, yeah, so 20K.

Speaker 1:

How about that fancy math?

Speaker 2:

12.4. Why'd I get 15? So three 5Ks is three is 9.3. I'll take my socks off, yeah, oh man. Why'd I think that was 15 miles? Yeah, that's silly. That's like almost the same number as 18. Right.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, what an idiot. So so so two times 10K would be 12.4. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Why'd you tell me that earlier? I think I said that earlier. I was like, oh, that's 15 miles.

Speaker 1:

I didn't know that early Cause I started thinking about these times. Yeah, they're, they're running, are fast that makes sense, it's 105, 107. Christian Blumenfeld ran an hour.

Speaker 2:

So 9.3 plus another 3K. Yeah, yeah, okay, yeah, oh yeah. So it's less than than a half yeah.

Speaker 1:

So so the run's going to be harder than a half right.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's got in your biking less, so you got, you got. I mean you got. It's a closed energy system, right? So if you're doing six less miles, you're riding harder, right. So it's somewhere. It's like one click below a half.

Speaker 1:

It's not an Olympic, but it's one click below a half and I think I, I think that's what that's what Jan Frodeno said about the race in Milwaukee was the bike power that some of these guys guys were riding was insane, cause I think they they come off the bike thinking I just got to run 10 or nine or whatever.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, cause, yeah, and, and they can put those surges, they put those first five to 10, they can take more. There's more tactics, I imagine, as opposed to a big steady state thing there's going to be. And that distance is what? 11 point, 11.2 miles, 11.18. Yeah, I don't know why I wrote 15. That's in in in my defense. We just did a pretty awesome trail run this morning.

Speaker 1:

So yeah, it's 18k but it's going to feel like 15 because you bike way too hard and if you ridden hard, it's going to feel like 18 miles.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you know, what I think of immediately is the guy how many times we did a half. You're like, oh it's just a little bit shorter. Yeah, Wheels fall off a mile, mile 11.

Speaker 1:

Perfect. I think what this allows is those that those pros are. They have speed, can use it. And if you, if you watch the swim swim, start from the ones that I've watched it is all in from the word go.

Speaker 2:

I mean they just all in.

Speaker 1:

So I think the times are probably half hour short for the pros are half hour shorter than a half, which is a sprint to them. So I mean people. Their systems allow them to be all in.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it'll bring maybe more of the ITU guys into race, right. Right, so to to make sure that we give you a little bit of clarity 2k for the swim, 80k for the bike and 18k for the run. So that's 1.2 mile swim, 50 mile bike and then 11.18 run.

Speaker 1:

It's still an interesting distance. Yeah, it really is.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it'd be. It'd be fun. I'd like to do it. I've not done one yet and it'd be cool to do.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think the other current event's important to point out is Taylor Nibb she she qualified for the Olympic Games by a Olympic trial qualifier on the on the Paris course I think. She was fifth overall, which provides her with an automatic qualification for Olympics. So that's awesome, it's exciting.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, really cool man, interesting to see where the sport's going. What Ironman just had. I think I said you a message yesterday, Ironman Canada, which I mean you sort of see it coming. The wildfires have just been bad. They had Montreblanc 70.3 get canceled. They have Canada. I mean there's bigger problems. So it's not a woe is me for us, but but that's, you're challenging people that like train for it and now have to you pivot a bit and we hope everybody's really safe and they're doing the right thing. But but man, that's it's tough. I can imagine being a race director and putting on races and then what does that mean? Right, that's, that's a big hit. So I hope those athletes find a place to be able to race this year. That works for them.

Speaker 1:

But that was unfortunate, but I wonder how Ironman deals with that. Yeah, Because if you have two thousand, let's just say there's 2,000 athletes. Now you need a spot for those athletes, and I know that Florida's full and Arizona's full and I don't know other, not other North American races I guess. I guess Cancun's around Thanksgiving usually, not Cancun. Cozumel is around Thanksgiving usually. But where do you put 2,000 athletes Without saying, okay, we'll sign you up for next year, but then you've raced and trained and you've gotten gotten around. I don't know. It's, you can see how I'm, because they're not giving your money back because they've spent it. They've spent it on preparation. They've spent it on a lot of that. Money's been spent, yeah.

Speaker 2:

And spent that they're not getting back either, right? So they they take a hit and you know what that's? The bad part is that, unfortunately, ironman for a while had not been super athlete friendly because they they had a bit of a monopoly on it. I mean, I love Ironman, we do it, but but they also didn't build a ton of good will.

Speaker 1:

No competition.

Speaker 2:

So, like now, they find themselves in these tricky spots and and it I'm assuming now, with this current climate of the challenges that they've had, that they're being more athlete friendly. But that's also like to me. We've talked about it on here. Where are they five years from now? Like where, where is Ironman five years from now? Right, and honestly don't, I don't know.

Speaker 1:

Well, a lot negative has happened, in my opinion. You split Kona into into male, and male and female, and I'm not sure that a single sex, sex for race in Kona, whether it's for this male or female, is going to have the same same Pizazz as a, you know, as a combined race. Yeah, because, as we have seen that, that, that that race day that combines men and women together, is crazy. It's spectacular.

Speaker 2:

It's special man. It really is. It really is special. It's truly an international race. Location of it is challenging for us to get to, but it opens up. It opens up the world to it. So when you went there, it was the first time where it's like truly an international race. Nowadays, when they do world championships, if it's in Europe, it's usually a European dominated race. If it's in the US, it's a US dominated race. But in Kona it's that special, that's a, that's a special place. And to have males and females together, I loved, when I love the idea of females being able to race on their own day. They're like the the two there is. I thought that was okay. But to like break that up it's it just feels like. I mean, it's it's sort of the beginning and the end, and I hate to say that I don't know if they can pivot and make it change and maybe five years from now we're like no, okay, it's sort of sorted out, but this one feels it sort of feels wrong. Yeah, yeah, I kind of feel like that too and I'm thrilled. I know some athletes and we've got some athletes that are a female going to Kona races here. I'm thrilled for them and and, and I think that they're going to have a great experience I think they're going to truly feel that sort of like Kona vibe. I don't think that withers down totally quite yet, but I'm saying like three years from now, I think the, I don't know, I think the I think it has an effect on it that might be hard to come back from.

Speaker 1:

I do too, and I think with the, with the increased interest in the PTO, because the money, the race, and I mean will Kona be their focus. You know where the top level triathletes their, their only race that was important to them was Kona, right and and now you have have have so many half Ironman specialists and you have people, people, people coming, coming, coming out of short course race and what's the focus?

Speaker 2:

And and so do you think PTO? Let me ask you this first Do you, do you think PTO sort of fills that void? Do you think PTO is capable of that?

Speaker 1:

Not sure. Yeah, cause I mean they're paying their athletes better. Yeah, they're providing a venue that spectator for you know friendly, I think you pointed out when we were talking about this morning is like an eight lap course on the bike and six lap course in a month. You know it's spectator friendly, so hopefully that that brings a lot of people interest in you know, into the sport. Does that help? I think? I think I think yes, but until the PTO can come up with an event that sells on on television or some kind of kind of streaming venue where it's huge, huge money, yeah, I'm not sure.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's not like you know, the the ITU is taking off here. It's not like I mean, and the concern I have, this I'm good, I didn't think about it till now as we've talked about it. You look at that distance, Well, right, as you go longer, that it can also extend the life of that professional athlete. I mean, as you go shorter, right, our peak power goes down as we get older especially after it Amen. Yeah, but even after age 28,. Right, I know, but your, your endurance, your peak level of endurance can stay high for a very long time, so like, while the ITU to me is sort of the young man's game and then not to say that I'm as old man's game, but, but that's more for the seasoned athletes sort of went up. In fact, you know, you see these, these younger ITU athletes coming in a little bit sooner, which is pretty cool, but but there is sort of that next tier that I think. I think I think the PTO is an extension to hybrid between you, kind of this, this short I don't want to say short course, it's not short course but this this sort of like punchy, tactic style racing as opposed to like a longer ultra endurance event that's, you know, driven by performance. Right, it's not a, it's not a zombie fest that lasts like 48 hours, it's it's a half day event. That is like tip to tail. So I would hate to see, I mean, who takes that void of the ultra side of it. You know, PTO is sort of like they can, they can start to put a huge dent in the 70.3s, yeah, but then who picks up that ball for and is it. Is it a challenge? Tried, rev, three, try. They sort of like got gobbled up. Is it more to where Iron man needs to retract? They grew so quick and then they need to sort of like re strategize. It's just interesting in five years from now, where is it? Because it can't be where it is right now.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and I don't think there, you know, as far as public interest, it's going to be much less for an Iron man event that that, even on the fastest days, last eight hours it's going to be hard for somebody to sit in a spectator, to sit and watch something for for eight, for eight hours, yeah, right. We can have an event that lasts three and a half hours. It's hard, but you know.

Speaker 2:

That's doable. Yeah, I've had, we've had our families out there enough times and they're great support man, they're out there. But you know we always talking beforehand we're like, hey, we'll be here, we'll be here and we sort of strategize their time. But you, we also are like, hey, don't like, it's alright if you're not there. I guess a long day, like having enjoyed and and watch friends and had that opportunity, it's, it's, it's a luxury and it's really cool to be a good Sherpa, but at the same time there's a lot of downtime and you're like, huh, is this really what you go through? I didn't know. This is what you go through. If this is what you go through, don't stress about like, just come out, maybe see me a little bit on the run, let's meet here. Let's meet here, here's a, here's a little window, and enjoy the rest of your day, something like that. Right? So yeah, no, it'll be. It'll be interesting to see how it unfolds. And I don't, I mean, the weird part is like I, I don't really have a dog in the race. I, I, I like, I really like Iron man. I love race and Iron man. I think they do a wonderful job. I think there's been some strategic changes that I find that I don't know what it'll look like in the future for them. There's some PTO stuff coming out. You know, I'm interested in going to challenge Roth again.

Speaker 1:

I think that would be pretty cool.

Speaker 2:

I'm more intrigued by that right now than I am any other Iron man race, and that's the first time.

Speaker 1:

I am too yeah.

Speaker 2:

So I don't know if we got any thoughts sharing with us. We'd like to know, cause. Um, yeah, we sure don't know, but we'll find out. Ah, I forgot to tell you about something. I always wondered what this would look like. Unfortunately, Mike, I love you, man, I hope you don't mind this. It I actually know you don't, cause you're a warrior. I always wondered like, yeah, travel with the bikes, you touch those rotors on the back. I'm like boy, those seem thin. I wonder if I'd like I don't want to touch my finger, what if my finger I bet you that sliced right through me? Well, he had a bike rack. He, he didn't break anything, he was essentially kind of all right, except for I'll show you a picture His calf got split. Why, it looks like you opened it with your scalpel Right, and it is probably it must have been like 10 inches or so, I think and it just it, it's splayed them wide open. He didn't even feel it, he didn't even know it. He just like he got up, he's like I think I'm all right, and he looked down and his calf was splayed open, which is, oh my gosh. I always wondered, like what would happen if that hit. Well, yeah, it does some serious damage. It's sharp, but but he got stitched up, he's all right. What's your, what's your medical advice about that? If you you got stitches Now the bad parts on his calf, what would your advice be?

Speaker 1:

So that that's a dirty wound. So those rotors are dirty and anytime something on your bike cuts through your skin you go to the ER and you hope that whoever's seeing you is going to do a good job washing things out. But we'd highly recommend one. Make sure your tetanus is up to date, because it's awful hard to train with lockjaw.

Speaker 2:

I can't remember the last time I got a tetanus shot. That's a good point. Make sure you have a tetanus shot. And let me write that down Where's my pen and two, you need antibiotics.

Speaker 1:

So just simple coverage because, just you know, it seems like a surgical cut, but you're being cut with something that's dirty. It's been on the road, it's been on the rain and all the all the crap that gets gets on your bike has now been grounded into your, into your skin, and we, as surgeons, as we do clean out, we can actually only get all the dirt out of there, and just takes one, one bacteria or one piece of dirt that has bacteria on it for it to to blow up on you. So you got to follow it and you need, you need tetanus and you and you need, and you need antibiotics for seven to 10 days. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So proactively get on the antibiotic? Absolutely? Yeah, that's great advice. Yeah, no, so I thought you'd like that. I'll, I'll. I think I showed you maybe I showed you a picture earlier. Um, uh, it's pretty wild. I always wonder what that would look like and I hope I never see it again. Now, all right, I saw it. No, I don't ever want to see it again. So be careful out there, be smart. Uh, those things actually are pretty darn sharp.

Speaker 1:

I got another story for you. So, um, a son of of somebody I worked with was hiking in West Virginia and got bit by a rattlesnake, oh God. And then, um quick, uh, a quick period of time, he was super sick, yeah, and has had multiple, um you know, icu admissions over the last week or so because they can't keep his platelets up. So there's something about the venom of a rattlesnake that's an autoimmune to your, to your to your platelet count. So as we ran trails this morning, I was thinking about that. As I was tiptoned over racks, I didn't want to say anything because I know, I know, I know, I know you have a a, I am a sissy.

Speaker 2:

I do not mess with wildlife. That's why I like to run trails in the winter. The snakes are out, but but I'm assuming that he could do you, just step on it. You don't see them. They've great camouflage, absolutely.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely.

Speaker 2:

Oh dude, that's horrible. Don't tell me that. I just I don't want to hear those stories. They got you told us after the trail run, because it's still warm out and I was also thinking like, hey, when it's when it's cooler now, it's like cools down the morning a little bit, what do they do? They come out to the open to like warm up on a little bit of sun On the rocks where you sit. Yeah, or you put your foot Right.

Speaker 1:

Just be careful out there.

Speaker 2:

All right, all right, I think that's enough before it gets even uglier. Yeah, be smart, look out for snakes and and your rotors, and your rotors, hey. So I got a. I got a idea for this week's topic and purposely didn't talk to you about this because I want to get where you are, because I know where I am with it I got a feeling that maybe even a little bit different places let's talk about resets. My, my thought behind it is, I think a lot of us and we've experienced this over the years I mean, gosh, you've been doing this for decades now and it's, there's been times where you got to hit a reset button and that can be for many different reasons, whether it's your work, it's life, it's you're coming back from an injury, it's all kinds of different things. But, like about knowing when that reset, sometimes there's very defined things like an injury, that that's clearly a reset. But there's other times when we've got our priority list right, we've got our family and we've got our work and we've got our play and our training, and you bring it up and in your right, even though I argued the other side too, but you're still right, as always. Where you know, I always say, hey, try to search for balance. Okay, there's no balances. This yin and yang and then the resets, is because there is that yin and yang and there's there's really no balance with it. When you find that you got to make sure that you put enough time and energy in the priorities that are important to you, maybe ahead of training, you just got to figure out where that reset is and we work enough. Athletes whether we see them clinically or we see them, you know, out, training along and their friends about. Like sometimes we know we need a reset but we don't see it. Or maybe we do see it but we force things because we think we have obligations that we need to do or we lose our way. So I thought, maybe, if you and I maybe talk through, what is a reset to you, what's a reset to me? Where have we done it? Where have we done it now? And maybe that you know it would be a conversation that you know everybody who's listening. Maybe you've been there, maybe they're there now, and maybe anything that we share as we walk through, because I don't have, we don't have all the answers. We have experience with this stuff and we're just like you too, where there's no perfect way. We're trying to find the right pathway to keep ourselves sane, to make sure that we're great husbands, fathers, you know mothers, family members, anybody who's out there and then make sure that our work is something that we're proud of, and then also the training to keep us sane. So that was kind of my thought. Let's start anywhere you want to, but like what when you think of reset? You know that's what I think of as sort of reset. What do you think about reset?

Speaker 1:

To reset to me means we're kind of off the rails of what of off the off, what our perceived rails were going to be, and I think we did a pretty good job on defining goals several podcasts ago. Yeah, we we all not we all, most of us like to set big, scary goals and we work toward those goals day to day, month to month, year to year, and that kind of guides us right. And reset to me means I've come off the rails and I'm no longer working toward that one goal. And I think your point about priorities, especially a hub, are, are super important. I think as long as you look at your priority family work and then play I think you can't lose Right. So if you, if you, if you put those in order and you make the, make the decisions along those lines, then you're going to be fine. Yeah, but play and we consider, consider play to be exercise, fitness, racing, as you know, as play should be always be your third choice. And from what I've been through the last two weeks or so, family, family should always be your first choice and I've had to reset what I've done this summer because of some family issues and talk about that on the last podcast. But if you're quote off the rails, that may mean that your goal for your third priority may change, but that's okay. And I think the most important thing is you have to be okay. Changing that, yeah Right, yeah, cause if you know, honestly, if you're changing your play time goals, ain't that big of a deal, no Right. And you may change what race you do, you may change the way you're training, you may change what your focus is, but if your priority is family and your family focus is intact and the next priority is working you're working hard at work then your play priority if that has to change a little bit, that's okay, yeah.

Speaker 2:

You know there's a there's a rule I have, and, as you say, that, I kind of now appreciate that it really is a rule of mine. I say it in a joke, but I but I really really mean it. As soon as this stops becoming fun, I got to find something else. Right, it's not to say that like there's plenty of sessions where like, oh man, this one's gonna be a little bit of a grind. There's some days that you're like in it and some days that you're sort of like a little bit more of a mental challenge to kind of get through. But the big picture is like it's a healthy outlet. Right, this is really really good. And if I'm not, if I'm not having fun or I'm not like headed towards something that's making me better, I've got to start to kind of reintroduce, and that a lot of times creates a reset, and that can be where you kind of come off the rails because you've done too much, but it also can be a less aggressive sort of coming off the rails. We're like, hey, I'm sort of lost my passion for what I'm trying to chase those goals. I don't know what they are and I don't want to make fake goals. I don't want to make goals, because I think I got to have a goal. It's got to resonate with me, so it's got to be fun, and if it's sort of not fun, then you got to take a step back and create some space. I think a lot of times we don't give ourselves enough space to like genuinely find that Every time, every once in a while, you run across an athlete and I don't know about you, the Northeastern, I'll call them out and right away. I want people. I want to surround myself with people that always call me out on things, right away too, as you get around somebody who's like just sort of like Dappie Downer with all the stuff that they're doing and maybe we've all had bad days, not to say you can't like vent a little bit, but you'll get around people that sort of a constant theme and I look at them and be like you know you don't have to do this right. Like doesn't sound like doesn't sound like you're happy. Why don't we take a step back and why don't we find something that like find the join it again? And sometimes, when we do, long course, I don't know about you Some of my resets have been like I just need. I've been like Brett Favre. I always kind of joke I'm like Brett Favre, I'm retiring, I'm good man, I'm out right, because at the end you're exhausted from all the work that you did and you're like I'm pretty satisfied with that, and you know, then the off season comes and you're still retired, but then you get that little inkling and the want to comes back, right. So if you give yourself some space, almost always the want to will come back. But I think so many people are afraid to step away that they lose fitness or they're going to lose what they gained, that they don't. They don't take a step away and they don't get the want to back. And it's time to hit a reset because what'll happen is is you'll push through it, you'll end up injured almost always, because at some point your body's going to break. Your mind's telling you your body will break and then you're going to underperform and it's going to be. That's why I find a lot of those people that are really, really deep. They're in this overtraining syndrome to where their mental batteries just down and then it creates that space and it comes back to your goals Like are you okay? They made goals. Do they? Do they excite you? Do they resonate with you? Do they? Do you get jazzed up thinking about it? Are you motivated to do it? And if you're not, then you know, take a step back and start thinking about a reset. Right, so you're? You're that's an indication that you're off the rails. I think of when you say off the rails. I think of like, ah, you're out, you're, like, you're way off track, or you're you went West and you're supposed to go East and that happens at East amount. But like, sometimes it's just is need a, you need a reset, you need to come back, you need to recalibrate. Starts with getting with your family, right. Get with the family disconnect a little bit and those goals and those resets usually come with a little bit of space.

Speaker 1:

We had the benefit of seeing people reset. Every day you have an athlete that is torn their ACL, they've torn their their their root to their cuff and their goals obviously changed. And how do we help them work through that to hopefully get back to their pre-injury level? And I think we can use those lessons to help us all. Reset may not be quite as dramatic of having life changing surgery or or being out for six months because of a stress fracture, but those lessons I think can be valuable what we teach patients and what we see patients could go through as we're trying to reset maybe our fitness goals.

Speaker 2:

And you got to be a guide to them. Right, we're trying to guide, cause we always look at it like, hey, we're Yoda, you're Luke Skywalker, it's about you, it's not about us. We're trying to help, guide you. You're going to be the one, you're the hero, you're going to beat the Death Star and they get lost a little bit. When somebody gets lost or they need, they need a guide and they need somebody to kind of help them along with it. So so we do that clinically all the time and you know your training partners and your, your people around you also, hopefully maybe can lean in a little bit, but are you, you know, as we. One of the things that brought it up is because I think, correct me, don't let me speak for you, but I'm in a reset mode right now. How about you?

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. Yeah. I mean I had certain goals for the summer. You know you and I talked about doing some Olympics and maybe doing a half and you know family came first. So my fitness dropped and I'm not going to just stick my head in the sand and keep grinding out because we think that's, that's not fun and if you add that stress to all the other stress in life, that's just not a healthy environment. And as we, as we talk about reset, you know, there I mean I was looking at my experience I've had to reset my expectations because of age, right, I've had to reset my expectations because of certain injuries in the past and I've had to reset my expectations if my priority one my family are probably two and then they don't get in the way but they, they take priority. So I think, I think we deal with reset all the time. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So, how did you? What do you like? How did you get to where you are right now? Like, like the actual, like the like, when did you sort of know it? What did you do? Like like, what sort of space did you create? What's it look like? How did you? How did you get? How'd you get to where you are now? Within that reset?

Speaker 1:

So I think I was on a really good track, fitness wise, excited about doing Olympics, being you know, you know all in. And then I had to do some. I had to do some traveling and I was, I was, I was out of sorts, and you basically, basically, basically realize those times pace, heart rate, power you're aiming for aren't there and you can. You can make yourself be miserable and pout about it, or you can accept where you are, and I'm of the age and wisdom I've been doing this long enough time that I know where I am, and I think that's one of the most crucial aspects as we talk about goals, when we're doing our podcasts on goals understand where you are. Now. You may you may not be able to get those eight sessions a week or six sessions a weekend. That's okay, yeah, it's supposed to be fun. So I think the first thing in the reset button in my mind is know where you are at this moment.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, and not where you were, where you want to go with like what truly? And tests don't guess I mean sort of whether it's a field test or lab test or just that way it's. It's take the emotion out of it, right, like the emotion part muddies it. So, yeah, have a true assessment of what that is and do some testing and then, if you get the result, don't pass those results. So it is what it is. Start to get back into something that works for you and then maybe retest again in five weeks or something. But yeah, no, no, where you are now.

Speaker 1:

So I think, if you, if you know where you are now and you're honest about that, and then you can reset your goals where you want to. You know where you want to be and, as we talked before, that is short-term goals and long-term goals and develop a plan to get there. So, if you, if you, if you're not honest with yourself about where you are now as far as your fitness goes, then you're going to drive yourself crazy. Well, why can't I run 715 pace? You know why. Why? Why? Why can't I ride 250 watts? Cause you had to do that, because you haven't, you hadn't been consistent, because your top two priorities got in the way of your fitness. Why? Because fitness is number three on the list. That's okay, yeah.

Speaker 2:

And you know you always, you always lead by example. I love it, man. I mean honestly, I, I, I. I couldn't say that honestly more. And you know families come first. You've been there. We won't go into the depth of it, but you know you've got several things that, if any one thing happened, is an insane amount on somebody's plate. And you got a bunch. And you, you, you endure and you focus and you prioritize the right things, and that you know that takes the energy and the time as it should. And then I got a text a day or two ago and it was like, okay, so what's, what's fall looked like Right. So now you're in a mental space where you're like, okay, right, I'm not where I was, I'm not necessarily in the trajectory that I'd kind of set out in the beginning part of the year. You know I put, I put my efforts where they need to be. I'm coming out of it and recovering. There's still a lot out there and a lot going on with it. But now I'm in a headspace where I'm like, okay, I, I, what are we going to do? I don't have, I don't have a North Star, I don't have any sort of goals that excite me yet, but I'm ready. And then the mindset for it, and then we start that conversation Right. So, um, how'd you get there?

Speaker 1:

So, um, one is, as I said before, I think you think I realized where I was and it and I'm at the point now where I don't, if things aren't going well, well, well, training wise, I don't get, I don't get frustrated anymore. I just I just don't. Um, I am as competitive as the day is long and I like being fit, but I also understand when the fatigue, or when I'm not sleeping, or if I'm traveling, I can't be, I can't be consistent. Yeah, I, you know, I understand where I am. But I think one of the key things is, if you understand where you are, what's going on in your downtime? Right, we can pout and do nothing. Right, and dig a deeper hole. Or our downtime, we can do what we can do. Yeah, right, you have your, your priority list and there's certain things you need to do. Yeah, I need to be there for my family. I have a certain amount of responsibility at work, but I might be able to get in Six hours a week instead of 12 hours a week, yeah, right. So in your, in your downtime, I think one of the most important things is you don't spiral and do nothing. Yeah, because if you spiral and do nothing, you think you were frustrated running at eight, 15 pace.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Well, you know, wait, wait, wait, wait till you run nine minute pace because you hadn't run. In a month. You can run some. Your distance may be less, your pace may be less, but consistency can be key and the consistency also can provide you incredible benefits to your mental health. Yeah, all right, let's get started every other day or every third day, because that's what you're able to do. That's gonna help. Yeah, so part of that reset is understanding where you are now and what you can do in this quote downtime.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you know, I'll tell you, I fall into that category where, like when, especially when work right, so family always comes first, but when, especially when work needs, we've gone from you know gosh, six employees when I'm sort of first started and through the pandemic and now 15. And so that learning curve. So that takes me away from a lot of things that you know I had planned. Or I need to put out fires, and I'll do that from tip to tail. And one of the first things to get cut out is training. So there's plenty of times where I'll go through and I'll spiral out of it to where, like, I just don't even have the energy levels to get the stuff in that I need. But I didn't. Here's the thing. Yeah, I do, I didn't carve the self-care time out for me. I'm not doing it. I don't need to do it for fitness, I don't need to train it, but I need to do it for my mental sanity, because if I don't then you know your bad things can come from that. So that's where, and I think a lot of people struggle, like I do, to where that trims and it goes away, and then when you're in it, it's almost hard to be like man, that habit can never change. And then, as soon as you're out of it, it's kind of like how did it go south, how did it go off the rails? And trying to figure that out and just doing a little as opposed to worrying about a lot yeah, I struggle with that.

Speaker 1:

But as we get into our endurance stuff and our most fit state, we think and I'm guilty of this that if I'm not running an hour it's a waste of my time. Well, that's garbage. So if you're in your downtime, if you can run 30 minutes, if you can run 20 minutes, if you can go in your trainer and ride 45 minutes, even if it's just watching TV and spinning your legs, that's valuable Because in your downtime your fitness is gonna help your mental health, where we're all stressed during this downtime. And if you can do something we preach at hub over and over and over, consistency is key and it doesn't have to be consistency. It's a highest fitness. It can be consistency half hour run, it can be a 45 minute walk, it can be an hour spent on the bike. Consistency of just keeping that habit of doing something is gonna go a long way where your downtime, where your how far you go down negatively, will be less. So as you start to build back up for that goal, whatever your new goal is will be a less of a climb.

Speaker 2:

And when we talk about consistency, something to quickly define, to me that's frequency, so it's not duration, it's not intensity, it's anything like that. If you want consistency and make the goals really small so you don't have, oh, I gotta do an hour run and you maybe have a 20 minute window, do a 20 minute run, aim to. I've gotta do something seven days a week. I gotta do something five days a week, but, like you know what, make it stupid easy. You know what. I'm not gonna miss a 20 minute run three days a week. I don't care Doing that. And as somebody who's experienced out of the spirals to where it's like it's all in all out, sort of thing of like, ah, and you're like man, I'm tired, you can get it, but you got 20 minutes. Like, just get your shoes on, you don't even have to get through it, walk, if you want to a little bit, and every time you come back from it you're like ah, I'm grateful I did that right. I had every reason. I learned from something a long time ago. Like what did he say? He was one of those guys that ran like every day for the last 42 years or something.

Speaker 1:

I was like, seriously, I was like every day.

Speaker 2:

He's like not missed the day. He was so proud of it. I was like, not one day. I was like wasn't there one day when you woke up and you didn't want to do it? He's like, yeah, he was like there were plenty of days I woke up and didn't want to do it, but there was never a day I regretted doing it and I was like man never thought about that there's never a time I regretted doing it. So make the goals really small and just get up and you'll find yourself like probably in a pretty good place in a couple of weeks. You've minimized the damage, and that's to me what the consistency means is like, hey, keep up your frequency and aim really small, go, hey, I'm gonna try to do something three times a week, I'm gonna try to do something five days a week and make the duration shorter. That way, make sure it matches right the yin and yang. If the work and family are the fatter part, the thinner part's gotta be the training, but it's still existent there.

Speaker 1:

Still needs to be there.

Speaker 2:

It can't disappear.

Speaker 1:

And it may be more important that your 20 minute run for your mental health and not your physical health no, you're probably not getting fit, but that mental health support of doing something, moving your body is tremendous, yeah, and not only for that time, for the endorphins to just feel a little bit better, but the clarity to solve challenging problems.

Speaker 2:

Right, I don't know about you. To me, running is meditation. I mean that's when you're just in tune with your body and present time, consciousness. A lot of the you see through the noise, right, when you're done, those complex things that you're dealing with that you don't have time for, it'd be like, hey, if I don't do it, I'm not the best me. I don't feel as good, but I'm also not thinking as sounding as I could be. And so, yeah, for the mental, I mean 100%. I would say it's not even like partially mental health, but I'd say at that point, is 100%, you just get a byproduct of actually keeping some fitness. So when you do want to train with something, you got a little bit of something there and some durability. But no, that's really good, so you got through that. So what did you pick something?

Speaker 1:

Yes, well, yeah, I think so. So those points we know. So know where you are downtime, we're doing it during your downtime, and then it's okay to choose something different, right? So I think you're gonna have to talk on the phone some. So I think at this point, instead of being triathlon focused, I'm gonna be run focused, likely gonna sign up for Richmond. I'm gonna be able to put you in a position of marathon so I can race local. But I think that's a scary enough goal and it'd also be a tribute to my dad, who is still. Even if I had a fantastic day, he's gonna have a faster marathon than I'll ever have but maybe try and run Richmond.

Speaker 2:

well, and Moose did the most beautiful yield I've ever heard, and what a tribute to the legacy of an incredible man. But during that yield you also did point out that he's the fastest marathoner and he will remain the fastest marathoner in the family. So, yeah, yeah. So that's a beautiful and it'll be a beautiful tribute.

Speaker 1:

Right. So maybe a little more run focused and it gives us several months to build back up. I mean, we ran trails today and trails to me is a reset button in itself because we always run trails in the winter and it's a signal that the race season is over and we're starting our winter stuff and I think there's so much much benefit to running trails. One I'll preach on again mental health, because you're out there and you're not worried about pace. You have to worry about heart rate a little bit because your heart rate goes through the roof, but you're not worried about pace, you're out there. Every step's important. You gotta pay attention to every step, but trails to me is a reset button where it's okay, we're gonna start something new and the run fitness you can get from trails and the stability you can get from trails and just the mental health you can get from being outside on the trails, I think's tremendous.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, boy, that's true, it really is a reset. We were out there earlier in the season like usually we start in what October and we're out there now what mid August and I was like it feels touristy out here because we go out there when it's really cold and through pretty much every element, so there's not many people at the parking lot, but apparently when you go in the summertime people go there to hang out.

Speaker 1:

People are there and we just hope when they scare the snakes off.

Speaker 2:

Yes, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, thank God. No, yeah, that's true. Yeah, that was really good.

Speaker 1:

So for me, I've got a great idea where I am yeah. I'm in a great place with my family and our new normal. My kids are settled for the fall school year. Trying to be as consistent as I can and what I get to do I do not lose sight of sessions that I don't get in because I just can't get them in and I have a goal and so I'll work week to week, month to month to try to reach that goal. And I'm also realistic to know if I come off rails again, I'll change my goals because in the long run it doesn't matter. It matters truly to me and it matters to my friends that are close around me. But the other people, they don't care and that's fine.

Speaker 2:

There's been plenty of times where we've signed up for races. Well, I'm notorious for this. I'm in Texas, I'm not training a long course in the wintertime, but there's been plenty of times where we've signed up for races, for one reason or another, somebody's had to back out and we've gotten nothing but support from one another because I don't care. I care about you, I care about your well-being and I'm actually more proud about friends that are doing the right thing by them, as opposed to feeling obligated. Now it's nice to have some accountability for things that are out there and you share those experiences, but I think that that's a neat thing to bring up of how much that we've always supported one another for, when the time is right, if it's the right thing to do. We also have a great enough relationship with all our core training people, too, to give a little tough love where it's needed. For the ones that like, hey, let's make this happen, so you Get back on it. Is it for their well-being? Are they backing out in a good purpose and as an alignment with what you know is good and in their goals, or do they need a little friendly nudge to go no, let's stay on the rails, man Right, and so that's just kind of neat. So, as you have training friends and you have people around that love you, you be there to help guide them, to show them when they need a reset, and then also be able to differentiate, when you can just give them a little bit of guidance, a little nudge in the right direction.

Speaker 1:

So how about you? You claimed you were at reset.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no, I'm-.

Speaker 1:

Because of work and family.

Speaker 2:

It's interesting, it's the beauty of what you do, man. You defined it really perfectly and as you talk about it it's exactly kind of like that's the outline of how I got where I am and then I'm discovering where I wanna go. Like, this year's been funny. My girls are eight and 10. So last year of elementary school for my oldest and training's just been different Work I mean it's less about family Work for me I've more than doubled the employees that we have. So work has just been like this new discovery right, and I'm learning the skills along the way to manage a much, much bigger team and office and that's been a challenge. So this year, and honestly, part of my focus has been making sure that number two doesn't gobble up number one. So number three has been there and I've worked around it and we had Penn State this year and we had some other races and training was just different this year. Right, it just I trained. I'm proud of what I did. I've raced like I wanted to race. I did what is available to me now right. Like you said, where am I now? You know I've had different builds where you know I've had the ability to really dial that in and feel really kind of honed in on it and just didn't have the ability to share. And that's okay, right, and I'm proud of what I've done because it was an alignment with what I was capable of doing. And then after Penn State I just sort of lost my way a little bit about you know, I've got some things I gotta really focus on. I don't have anything that sort of excites me. It's crazy hot. I've got like a whole pocket full of excuses and but I didn't have anything that really sort of like jazzed me up and I needed to pour some really high level energy and effort and time into work. I did a better job this time. I didn't fall off totally off the map. Like if you look at my training it would look like something that was, you know, kind of the bare minimum and historically, any injuries I've ever had have notoriously happened in these resets, because I'm not like I'm not all out, but I'm also intermittently training and so as soon as I start to run twice a week or it starts to interrupt and then I try to push towards a race, that's usually when I get injured. And then that's happened enough times to where every time I'm like I knew it, you big dummy. So as I get older I've been smarter about that, so had a decent build into those races, raced reasonably well and then just sort of didn't know what to do. And there's some local racing. It's in a weird flux because, like usually, there's some sort of Ironman motivation. That's sort of not there and I have a hard time. Time wise, what do I have available to me? What's my new normal? I'm discovering what this new normal is and I just got to figure out what times I have and it's hard to do multi sport. So I always do multi sport. Let's get in where we've talked about this. So I'm gonna swim, bike and run all the time. But to really dial in to be able to bike, like you want to bike, and to be able to swim and to be able to run and factor all those in, that's a bit challenging. So, as you were hitting your reset button, I'm hitting my reset button. And then your goal of, like, thinking about a marathon. I was like you know what Number one I want to support my dearest friends. And number two like, yeah, no, I can totally get on board on that. I can put run shoes on and go for a run. A long run is a couple of hours. A long bike is like a handful of hours. So the ability to get that in and then you swim as once or twice a week, use that as good recovery. Keep your swim fitness bike. Do some zone two stuff so that way I can unload and recover from the eccentric load of running. It doesn't have to be very high. I'm not looking for wattage performance or anything like that, so I'm just trying to discover what that new normal is. I need to hit the reset button because it's different now, because work is important, family is important and training. Back when I had younger kids and even before kids, training could take a bigger chunk of the pie in a healthy way. I could certainly force that now, but that would come at a cost of things that are more important to me than the fun of it and that doesn't resonate with me. In fact, that makes me resentful of the sport itself. To go, I don't even want to. Why am I doing this? Going back to what I said before, it's got to pass the sniff test. For me. It's got to be fun as soon as it starts to become work or it starts to become laborsome. This is my healthy outlet. It keeps me sane, keeps me fit. I need to. I'm addicted to constant self-improvement. I want to constantly get better. I want to. You're either getting better or getting worse. So that's kind of where I've been and this year's been, I would say as a whole. This year for me has been a reset. You're disguised as some of the training going up to discover this. Right, you notice and I'm noticing my mid-40s. I'm getting a little bit slower, so I'm adapting to that. I understand, as we get to the fifth decade and beyond, that that goes a little bit quicker. So I'm kind of in the same boat that you are as far as you're noticing that and the performance decrease. But the performance decrease is because I don't have the time to pour into it that I did before and that's okay right, I'm totally fine with that. I wasn't at first because I was like ah right, and trying to like what's the shortcut? And to your podcast before you ain't special yeah.

Speaker 1:

There is no shortcut.

Speaker 2:

There's no shortcut and the alternative just isn't an option for me. So I've come to really enjoy this, and then can we chase a marathon, can we reset hey, that excites me. Now, that's a goal. Can I be there for a brother who, who you know, I could be along that journey to celebrate, you know, his father and some challenging times. Can we keep each other accountable, you know? Can I fit into my life and make sure that it resonates with the goals I wanna do and where I am now? And so that's been the reset. So it's sort of this big reset year and then mid-year needed sort of a refocusing. And here we are now and I didn't know what that looked like and I didn't know, kind of, what this podcast was gonna look like. But these are the resets that you and I go through all the time. So I was like, hey, you know what, moose, let's not talk about it, but let's cover resets, because we're at a pretty big one. We're both a pretty big one from different angles and we've been through smaller ones and we've been through bigger ones and both of these feel like they're they're pretty important ones. So, by sharing that, like it's okay, right, it's okay, like if you're struggling with it, you find what is right for you, like you don't have to do what you think you're supposed to do. You can do what is like good for you and holistically good for you, for your family, for your work life, for your sanity, for your outlet, cause, at the end of the day, we do this for fun, right? We're not getting paid to do this. We like to challenge ourselves. Like you said, we're both crazy, stupid, competitive, right, and we'll get up and we'll punch, and we'll take punches and we'll like get up and we'll laugh about it and we're gonna fight all 12 rounds and we're still like that, but the fight's different. So I'm in a zone of self-discovery of that and I've got somebody like you to lean on who's done it and done it at a very high level. That can give me some clarity on that. But, at the same time, we've got to find what's unique to you, for those of you that are going through it, like, and if you don't know, sit down and create some space, right, create some space so you can give yourself an opportunity to have those answers. You can't have them right away. Most athletes are high achievers and they're used to working hard and getting great results, and sometimes you just gotta sit, give some space and then get back on the rails and you create a goal, see where you are now and head in that direction. So yeah, so it's marathon time is what it comes down to. I guess is what we're saying.

Speaker 1:

And it's interesting to hear you say so the most important key points I get from that one family's priority. Your Venn diagram fitness is a smaller wedge, but that wedge didn't go away and I think you've learned and I learned if that wedge goes away as we come back, we try to do too much, too quick at least the injury and looking, you're talking thinking back. I think if you're doing Ironman, multiple Ironmans, every single year, that ain't healthy, because as we get into our Ironman fitness we lose that sagittal plane. Or moving latterly side to side, you lose a lot of that. And I'm thinking back to the time so that I did Ironmans every year. I broke right. So in 2014, we did two, we qualified for Conan 14, I came back and did two and did Conan again. Then I broke my hip because I was all in and I got that bug that everything had to be long course. Everything was grinding it out and I broke. So I think having reset buttons, although it's not comfortable at the time, is healthy. So if you think, hey, I'm heading in the wrong direction, that's great and there's nothing to say. You're not gonna circle back to that Ironman fitness. But as you get over 40 and you get over 50, doing Ironmans every year ain't great.

Speaker 2:

No no, there's nothing. There's really not anything healthy about it.

Speaker 1:

You can circle back to it. But I think reset buttons are healthy, cause if you go back and reset and we were kind of laughing this morning about you know what we're gonna do and I need mobility stuff and if I can reset and work on my mobility, you say you need to strengthen stuff and that's past part of a reset. So understanding where you are, understanding where your new goals are and then having the day to day to work through those goals, I think reset's healthy.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah. And, like I said, no, we are now, I know, and we have preachers. Here's the thing our clinics are submerged with this stuff. Right, we're doing lateral rehabilitation, we're doing signal legs stability. We've got kettlebells, we've got strength. It's a therapy clinic. I've got to take more ownership of my strength, right, Honestly, where am I right now? And so, you know, that's something that I've got to work on. You talk about mobility. That's something you've got to work on. But that took sort of that honest self-assessment, right, it's no longer can be a shortcut if I want to do the things I want to do. So I've got to prioritize that. But, as you say, you know there's two kinds of reset buttons in my mind now. There's the proactive reset button and then there's the reactive reset button. Last year, I think last year, we both had the reactive reset button. We did Ironman mantra, we did a couple of halves, then we did Ironman mantra blots soon after, we did Ironman in Kona, and then we were going to run a marathon and I think we both sort of hit our limit. I hit mine sooner, I broke myself. You hit it about the other half of the half point of the marathon.

Speaker 1:

About mile 18. And then About my body, said you have been reset.

Speaker 2:

Yes, that was the big old moment for both of us Our bodies broke and that was a reactive reset. Hey, I got to do something now. I got to reset, let's recalibrate all this stuff. And, as we listed, it was funny because we were thinking about afterwards, like what do you think happened? And we were like, so tell me all the things that are going on. And tell all the things. And I'm like, yeah, maybe that's it, that whole list, and that was a reactive. And then this year I feel like we're doing a pretty good job. We're proactively doing the reset button. So they're both going to happen, but the reactive one's a little bit of triage and the proactive one can get in front of that. Like I say, an ounce of prevention is worth the pound of cure. If you can kind of see that you're coming off the rails, that you're not headed right, things don't resonate with you, You've sort of decoupled from the, you're putting more in than what you're getting out, or you're heading in a direction that doesn't resonate with you, you can get in front of it. So the more that you can have a proactive reset button, the better, as opposed to those forced reactive ones. Right, yeah?

Speaker 1:

So if you put your coach's hat on and you think this resonates with me, what now? So if you, as a coach, if an athlete came to you and said wow, I heard your podcast and it's me, I need a reset what do you talk through with them to get them on that right path?

Speaker 2:

as a coach, that's a good question, right? So I think maybe we can talk through this, because we do this all the time for clinic, we do it for coaching, I do. It goes back to what you just said. Well, where are you now Realistically? Realistically, where are you now? But not even like where are you now, like fitness, or who's what I'm doing? Like no, like headspace, like where, like what's going on, like what brought you to this point, right, right? So I think if you can understand what that is, then maybe you can learn from it, so the next time you get to that zone, so assess where you are mentally and physically Totally OK. Right, that's right. Hub Heal, understand, build Right, Heal. And heal doesn't mean heal from wound, Heal from like. Are you burning the candle at both ends? Are you abusing your body? Are you?

Speaker 1:

Burnout is real.

Speaker 2:

Burnout's just beyond real. I mean, most of us go through it because we do things at such a high level. So, to heal from that and like, what else is going on, how's family? Right? So let's go through the prayer. How's your family, right, right, how's your family? No, honestly, how's your family, how's your spouse, how are your kids? And more times than not, you'll hear hey, I'm going through these challenges with my child, right, I'm going through these challenges with the spouse. Ok, what do we need to do to try to get those back on the rails? Right, right, let's start there. How's work, right? I'm burning the candle at both ends. And so let's get some rest, let's get some recovery, let's get you to the point to where you can regenerate and you can start from a fresh place. So, where's your work assessment? Because, having those two factors, well then, now we start to talk about what do we even think is a reasonable thing? Maybe that's like in that Venn diagram, maybe a little slice. Hey, dude, like, three times a week, I want you to go for a light run. In the other two days a week, take your dog for a walk, go out and walk with your spouse. That's not enough. That's what you need right now. So it's a realistic start from your assessment, From your assessment yeah, from where you are and you're going, you're trying to heal from those and you've got to get those other pieces in order If you really truly want to get to a great place, and then you can start to look at like, ok, what are the things that you can do? For if you give your body from a coach's perspective and from a clinic perspective, tell me if this resonates with you your body can do amazing things in two weeks If you give yourself a little bit of space. I would say that if you I know it's hard you think you've got to push, but if you don't create habits, give yourself two to four weeks to reset your body, to get control of family work and then just a little bit of training for your mental health, to keep you sane.

Speaker 1:

Frequency.

Speaker 2:

Frequency right and finding that something that can match. And then, as we get through that, let's start to unmuddy some things. In the next two or four weeks I want you to think about it. Let's meet again in maybe two weeks. And what excites you? Where do you think you're going? It'll come to you in the weirdest times, but you need some headspace. You've got to get out of the burnout zone. So get that under control in those first two to four weeks. And then in those two to four weeks, what are you thinking? And then we have honest conversations of I want to do an Ironman, be like, yeah, but you just told me you're working 70 hours a week and you've got to focus on some child time. Why don't we think about maybe Ironman next year when we do some shorter things now? So it's all individual dependent. But you want to heal first and you want to understand where they are and what to do. And then, once you heal and you understand, then we can create a plan to start to build something that is in alignment with that. That's hub, right, he'll understand, builds. So a great part is the name, so it helps direct me of what I want to do, because it's truly what I think that we should all do, and that's why we're named the way we are. So I don't know if I answered it, but you did.

Speaker 1:

And I think one of the key points that I tell athletes that I have to operate on or have significant downtime is you've got to forget your fitness. Forget about it For a month, for two months, it might be three or four months. Forget about your fitness.

Speaker 2:

You have to.

Speaker 1:

Because if you're used to being a seven minute mile tempo guy and you're resetting our girl and you're resetting, forget about your fitness. It's hard because we're used to push, push, push but it doesn't matter how fast you're running. So I think one of the most important things when you're resetting in my mind as a guy, as a physician or even as a coach forget about your fitness.

Speaker 2:

How do you get that? That's an easy thing to say. How do you get them to buy in?

Speaker 1:

I have a hard time buying in. But just thinking about this, it's easy for patients to buy in Because if I put a hurting on somebody, if I do their ACL or if I fix their rotator cuff, there's nothing they can do. They have to forget about their fitness. But if they're trying to reset because of family issues, it's hard and I think it takes some wisdom and I think it takes some maturity and I think in my personal case it's taking and making some pretty bad mistakes to forget about fitness. Because before, if I'm down because of other issues, I'll crank right back up and I'll break my hip or I'll strain my calf or I'll do something bad. But I've been down that road enough times and I know when I'm on my reset I should leave my watch at home. It doesn't matter. It might be four weeks, it might be eight weeks, who knows it's what suits that individual person. But when you're trying to get through this reset process, forget about your fitness.

Speaker 2:

You know we had a conversation about that earlier today, about hey, being smarter this time. We've done it wrong enough times to learn to do it right. That's how I broke myself last year trying to like force, something like that. So it's hard. It's not something that we say, that we go. Yeah, we know the way you need to forget about fitness. We know that's hard. I mean it's really hard, man. I mean from a trust perspective, from a mental health perspective, from an identity standpoint. It's part of our identities, become who we are. So people who don't do what we do, don't understand, be like no, it's not a, it's a lifestyle man, like it's what we do. But it almost becomes too much of an identity at that point to where you can't, you can't get out of your own way and that's really hard. So you want them to buy into it, but it takes a lot of trust.

Speaker 1:

Ask them does it truly matter if you're running seven minute pace versus nine minute pace? Yeah, it matters to them, likely. But the people you see on the trails, the people you see on the capital trail, the people you see running your neighborhood, they don't care. They see out there exercise, yeah Right. So it should only truly matter to you. And again, like me, if I've been down that road and I've made mistakes and I've gotten hurt, and I've gotten hurt so bad, it takes away my ability to be able to run. It takes away my ability to do fitness. I've made that mistake enough that I know when I'm rebuilding my fitness, I have to forget about fitness.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, something I would share with everybody and I would do in clinic as well as. Let me give you two examples, because it's still a struggle. There's I don't know about you, there's patients that I deal with. Mine's a little trickier because I didn't cut them up so they could still overdo it, but you can still do that, madam. There's sort of two responses, right. There's the one that they actually finally buy in, and usually when they do, it's followed by tears Because it's like they dropped 1,000 pounds off their shoulders. This finally takes the pounds off, because they've had that anchor with them the whole time. They couldn't put it down. And then finally somebody gave them permission and told them for their long-term health they needed to do it and they put it down. That's really powerful, and those people not only get better, they thrive right. They do pretty amazing things. Usually later on. Those are the ones that circle back, you may see, a year later, and they're like man, you changed my life. Those are the ones you're really proud of because they saw the byproducts of what they get, and so that's really powerful. But then you get the other ones who, no matter what you do, they can't let it go and they can't let it go. In my younger days in clinic, I would try to like really, really, really hard to try to like get them to that point and, despite them resisting, trying to continue to guide them. Now, as I get older, with it, I will love and I will guide and I will be persistent, but at some point we go. I don't think I'm your guy. Like I don't like I. You're gonna resent me. We're gonna have a relationship where I'm frustrated with you and you resent me because we're not gonna get to your destination. So I don't think I'm the right person. That's okay. Like you can do it that way. So if you're the person who comes up with all the different reasons of why you can't do it, things are gonna be challenging, right? I mean, I don't know, I don't know. And then that still doesn't work for the ones that sort of don't buy in. But it's for your long-term health, right? We're training for the eighth decade of life and beyond. You're screwing that up, right? So what you think is badass now or think that you can't let go, your quality of life is gonna suck, it's just gonna suck. So those are painful because you want to help them. You see that you can help them, but they're not mentally ready for that yet. So if you are one of those ones that have excuses of why you can't, at some point there's a bill that's gonna need to be paid. You're gonna have to pay it and unfortunately, when you get to that zone, when joints are bone-on-bone, there's no more unwinding that. It's too late at that point. So I just like to point that out, because if there's so much resistance in triathlon, we're OCD about training. We have a hard time doing it and I'm telling you from a clinical standpoint those that give themselves this space really go on to do amazing things and those that don't, it's not. There's not one person I can tell you say well, that person made it through. It does not end well and you wish you could stop it. So you try to figure out when that can be therapy. I mean, you can go to therapy and have somebody give you some clarity on some challenging things as you work through them, but the headspace one is really challenging in our world, I think.

Speaker 1:

So I was just hitting your thinking. I wrote an article for Activecom I don't know eight years ago about stress fractures and the reset stuff we've kind of been talking about for the last little bit. Fits that approach, and so it was written as a stair step return, where that stage one was your injury phase and that, and then that's what we're talking about. You've been injured and injury may be a stress fracture, but it also goes along with you've had to make changes because of family issues or work issues. So phase one is that quote injury phase, that phase. Forget about fitness. You gotta do if you can get a little bit in fantastic. The other most important thing about phase one is don't blame those around you. One thing we're all guilty of if I break my hip, I blame my wife. If I'm not fit, I blame this. So an important part of phase one is love those around you because they're the ones that are gonna be there. But that phase one is that assessment right and understanding where you are. The phase two is the next step where you still should probably be. Forget about your fitness, but look at your weaknesses right. If mine's mobility, even if my run fitness, is not where I want it to be. I can still work on my weaknesses. That's part of the reset button. And then phase three is that normal build training phase and then phase four is a race phase and then after phase four, you should hopefully go back to phase two or phase three, not back to phase one where you're hurt again, but that stair step approach where if you skip a step you're likely gonna come tumbling down the steps. So this reset button fits that stage one, two, three and four.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, no, that's fantastic. Do we do a podcast earlier on that? Do we do some of that build up or not? Check out the earlier podcast if you're thinking about it. But that was really good. And one of the things I love about that because you shared that with me is, in that first phase, coming back to like don't blame everybody. I think it also says, like, go home and apologize to everybody, Right, say I'm sorry, I love you, because you're probably not in your best state of mind right now, so make sure that the ones around you you say, hey, I'm sorry, it's not a you thing, it's a me thing, I love you, I'm sorry. So, yeah, no, for sure, man, so don't forget to apologize to the ones around you. But yeah, that's interesting. I was wondering where that would go with the reset, Because there's so many different angles of it, there's so different ways. It's whether you have fractured your hip or you have fractured relationships, or you're challenged in different ways. Like where is that reset button and what do you do? Because I've had so many resets in so many different ways. I think we navigate them really well but like, all right, how do we do it?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and you may not think you need a reset button. But if you go back and look at your times or your progress, if you're not making the progress you think you should or your coaches think you should, maybe you need a reset. Yeah, so it doesn't have to be that you broke your hip or you're half-stuffed, you can't train. It may be you've worked yourself into the ground and you're not making progress.

Speaker 2:

You know what Most people have resets programmed in. They didn't realize it Right at the end of their A race. They have a transition, they have that recovery. That's the reset. It's the storm. Right, the storm is over, and then you account for the mess. You clean up the mess, you hit the reset button, you build up the foundation, get ready for the next door. So there's resets all the time, but you maybe never looked at them and those are built in. But sometimes you need those bigger macro resets. Yeah, yeah, dude, and you should be having them on a somewhat regular basis, some bigger than others. Yeah, so, maybe, and also, if you're not sure, maybe ask some people that are who's your really tight circle. Be like, hey, do I need a reset? You're like, dude, you need a reset for like the last last year, the last few months, and, yeah, you'll find a lot about yourself. So you've got to right, you've got to pour judgment in yourself. Problem.

Speaker 1:

Lessons from the Knuckleheads. So our lessons from Knuckleheads? They're gonna follow along those same lines, where, if you're at a reset point, don't think you can take two weeks off, jump right back into what you were doing and not have the same result. So we see people all the time that have been injured and we say you need a reset and they come back and they say, well, I took two weeks off and did nothing and I went right back to my running miles and I'm having the same problem. Well, don't be shocked If you're doing the exact same thing and having the exact same issue. A reset is not two weeks off and then jump right back into what you were doing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, I mean, like I was saying earlier, that's where my injuries have happened. There's this sort of funny thing of like that first, that first one back, is sort of this honeymoon phase of like we tell everybody you're, after a week you will start to lose decent amount of fitness. After two weeks you lose quite a bit more and that's a gift you're gonna give yourself. It'll come back a lot, but that first week back you're not fit, but you're also fresh. Is the second week that you're not fit? I mean, you're not fresh. So the injury usually shows up on the second to third week. That's a great point. So you go back and you're like no, I'm fine, I feel great. Because you feel great because you finally gave yourself some damn space, you rested, you rested and you feel good. But you need this at least two week transition time of like, regaining that durability, so that. And it almost always shows up on that third week, that second week. So don't make that mistake. And, as Dr Haring says, you're not special, right, your body's not made differently. So give yourself that gift of like, enjoy that two weeks, and usually by the beginning part of that second week or the end of the first week, you're sort of grateful because you're like oh man, I'm a little bit more beat up than I thought, and then you see a really nice boost. And then that's if you only took two weeks, let alone more time. But man, that happens a lot where that's where you get injured. And I've usually happened for me because I'm trying to rush back to something and I think I can take a shortcut because I know what I'm doing and I can. Here's the reasons why. And I rationalize it and then pop and something bad happens. So yeah, man, lessons from knuckleheads. I've done that enough times for sure, and every time it's happened I've gone oh, I knew it, I knew it. And even before I remember one of the times before I ran I'm like this is probably not gonna go that great, I should not be doing this Right. And then boom, and you're like oh, you stupid dummy.

Speaker 1:

As your mama says, you ain't special.

Speaker 2:

You ain't special. Hey, that was pretty cool. Thanks for doing that, man. I was curious how that would go with, you know, both of us being where we are and I don't know. I thought that was pretty cool. So, to summarize, if I was gonna try to summarize it, keep me on point here. Make sure that we feel comfortable with this. If we're trying to hit a reset, first is realizing right, make a good diagnosis. Right, realize you need a reset. Give yourself some space and let that fitness go. Right, you're gonna get something bigger later, but realize it. Give yourself some space, let that fitness go. Then be realistic about where you are now right, Mentally and physically right. Don't forget to account for the mental side. Once you start to create that space and know that, then focus on what you can do. What's realistic, what can you do and given your priorities between family, work and play right, so what's realistic? Then, when the time is right and you can figure out the goals that really resonate with you, reset your goals right. Make sure they excite you, make sure that they are in alignment with something that you truly want to do, not what you think you are supposed to do, but something you want to do when it all comes down to the end have fun right, make sure you're having fun. That to me is sort of like that's the formula for getting through a reset, and I didn't know that formula until we walked through that. I really sort of I didn't. I mean, I think maybe working through that that sounds makes a lot of sense to me. What do you think?

Speaker 1:

I think that's fantastic, I think that's fantastic. It's a great way to see where you are now, where you want to go, and just make sure you're joining the process.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, man, don't forget that. I mean, at the end of the day, life's short, right. I think it was you that told me, or I'm sure it was the same, but I'd not heard that who's on their deathbed wishing I worked more. Who's the one that's sort of like wishing that they would have grinded more? When they get to that deathbed, man, Don't forget to have fun. This is a healthy outlet. It's what I love about triathlon. You're around optimistic people, they're fun to be around. But yeah, life is full of resets, right? Life doesn't give a crap, right? Everybody's got a plan to get punched in the nose. This Tyson was saying we get punches all the time. Life's not right. There's not like. If you're ever striving for that perfect life, it's not going to happen. So be adaptable, be smart and have fun. So what else? Any other words of wisdom? That's it, I think that's great, yeah, cool. Well, I guess, when you, as you would say, when you come to a fork in the road, what do you do? Always cool appeal, kd up Me.

PTO and IM
Hitting the Reset Button
Lessons From Knuckleheads
Wrap Up